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View Full Version : Is the word diet a dirty word for children



mrveggieman
08-31-2011, 03:31 PM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/on-parenting/post/is-diet-a-dirty-word/2011/08/30/gIQAtqiFqJ_blog.html?hpid=z8

habsheaven
08-31-2011, 03:36 PM
Diet is a dirty word for everyone. In most cases, "diet" implies that there is a time-limit associated with the change in what a person eats. The only way to lose weight and keep it off is to change how/what you eat FOREVER. It has to be a lifestyle change, not a temporary change to shed pounds.

mrveggieman
08-31-2011, 03:41 PM
Diet is a dirty word for everyone. In most cases, "diet" implies that there is a time-limit associated with the change in what a person eats. The only way to lose weight and keep it off is to change how/what you eat FOREVER. It has to be a lifestyle change, not a temporary change to shed pounds.

Agree. If someone is serious about getting and staying in shape one must not only look and what they put into their bodies they must also exercise their mind, body as well as spirit.

pghin08
08-31-2011, 04:03 PM
Diet is a dirty word for everyone. In most cases, "diet" implies that there is a time-limit associated with the change in what a person eats. The only way to lose weight and keep it off is to change how/what you eat FOREVER. It has to be a lifestyle change, not a temporary change to shed pounds.


+ 1000000. The people that have success are those that make the permanent changes necessary to live a healthier life.

DunkingDurant35
08-31-2011, 08:34 PM
habs is correct. As someone who likes many foods deemed both healthy and unhealthy, I've simply chosen to eat more of the former, and in lesser amounts, and it's made a big difference.

duane1969
09-01-2011, 08:47 AM
Wow, how soft have our kids gotten that hearing the word "diet" might damage them for life?

Option A: "Eternal psychological damage" from hearing the word "diet"
Option B: Heart disease, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes, sleep apnia, asthma, liver damage, spinal problems, knee/hip problems...

Am I the only one that sees the obvious choice?

Here is a thought. Ever see a fat kid with skinny parents?

Star_Cards
09-01-2011, 09:12 AM
it all depends on how the word is defined. there are two ways people us it. One tends to be more negative than the other.

DunkingDurant35
09-02-2011, 12:32 AM
Option B: Heart disease, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes, sleep apnia, asthma, liver damage, spinal problems, knee/hip problems...

Type 2, anyway. I hate to be too anal here, but it does get quite tiresome trying to explain to confused people how I can have "diabetes" as a thin, healthy 26-year-old since the only "diabetes" they ever hear about is the type 2 kind most commonly found in the elderly and/or overweight populace (and even then, type 2 can sometimes have other causes). Just a few weeks ago, my dad was explaining to an insurance agent how I have diabetes, and the first thing out of her mouth (with an EXTREMELY quizzical stare as she looked at me) was, "So you treat that with diet?"

duane1969
09-02-2011, 08:15 PM
Type 2, anyway. I hate to be too anal here, but it does get quite tiresome trying to explain to confused people how I can have "diabetes" as a thin, healthy 26-year-old since the only "diabetes" they ever hear about is the type 2 kind most commonly found in the elderly and/or overweight populace (and even then, type 2 can sometimes have other causes). Just a few weeks ago, my dad was explaining to an insurance agent how I have diabetes, and the first thing out of her mouth (with an EXTREMELY quizzical stare as she looked at me) was, "So you treat that with diet?"

A lot of things are genetic and people don't understand how it could be possible. I have a friend who is thin and looks generally healthy yet she has such high cholesterol that she has to medicate for it.