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View Full Version : Courts: Oklahoma cannot enforce sharia law ban



mrveggieman
01-11-2012, 09:35 AM
Why is this even an issue in the first place? We live in the united states and are subject to US law. Sharia law should not be an issue one way or the other. Just another attempt by bigots and right wingers who want to take away ones right to freedom of religion. SMH.

http://news.yahoo.com/court-oklahoma-cant-enforce-sharia-law-ban-011240179.html

Star_Cards
01-11-2012, 09:41 AM
I've never really got the sharia law fear. The US laws would take precedence over any religious law. religious laws whether they be muslim, christian, hindu, jewish, or any other religion have no place in a society were freedom of religion exists.

duane1969
01-11-2012, 10:08 AM
I don't understand this...


Defenders of the amendment say they want to prevent foreign laws in general, and Islamic Sharia law in particular, from overriding state or U.S. laws.


The only way sharia law would override state or federal law is if some idiot judge allowed it and it would then be overturned in a higher court. Last I checked state and federal law pre-empts all religious laws.

theonedru
01-11-2012, 01:41 PM
I've never really got the sharia law fear. The US laws would take precedence over any religious law. religious laws whether they be muslim, christian, hindu, jewish, or any other religion have no place in a society were freedom of religion exists.

Unfortunately Christianity has already influenced our laws and look at the mess it made of it

mrveggieman
01-11-2012, 02:30 PM
Unfortunately Christianity has already influenced our laws and look at the mess it made of it


Sad but true. SMH.

*censored*
01-11-2012, 02:49 PM
My post on this issue got deleted, apparently.

Basically, it's a bunch of feel-good jingoism by the Oklahoma voters. Do they really think having a law on the books that bans sharia law will mean a thing if sharia law ever becomes a legitimate threat?

habsheaven
01-11-2012, 03:07 PM
My post on this issue got deleted, apparently.

Basically, it's a bunch of feel-good jingoism by the Oklahoma voters. Do they really think having a law on the books that bans sharia law will mean a thing if sharia law ever becomes a legitimate threat?

I think the intent of the law is to keep Sharia law out of the "alternative sentencing" aspects of the judicial system. I know up here in Canada we have different jurisdictions that try to be PC and keep minor legal matters out of the court system by incorporating the cultures of the participants (think Native tribes).

mrveggieman
01-11-2012, 03:19 PM
I think the intent of the law is to keep Sharia law out of the "alternative sentencing" aspects of the judicial system. I know up here in Canada we have different jurisdictions that try to be PC and keep minor legal matters out of the court system by incorporating the cultures of the participants (think Native tribes).

I remember several years ago a church was offering to have to take on juniville offenders to work for them instead of sending them to youth camp. I don't have a problem with that per se but I would have a problem with the courts giving preferential treatment to christian churches and not giving other religions the option to work with youth offenders.

ensbergcollector
01-11-2012, 03:49 PM
I remember several years ago a church was offering to have to take on juniville offenders to work for them instead of sending them to youth camp. I don't have a problem with that per se but I would have a problem with the courts giving preferential treatment to christian churches and not giving other religions the option to work with youth offenders.

but were other religions offering the same thing?

how would a court give preferential treatment to a church? just curious

mrveggieman
01-11-2012, 04:02 PM
but were other religions offering the same thing?

how would a court give preferential treatment to a church? just curious


Say for example a 16 year old was convicted of a crime. A local mosque offered to take him in and mentor him instead of him going to youth camp? Would you be ok with that? If not why not?

habsheaven
01-11-2012, 05:53 PM
Say for example a 16 year old was convicted of a crime. A local mosque offered to take him in and mentor him instead of him going to youth camp? Would you be ok with that? If not why not?

This really has nothing to do with the law in question. I believe the law is intended to prevent such mosques from interceding when it is a member of their community that has run a foul of the law and they want to use their own form of punishment to conform with their religion/customs. If the mosque is going to impose or carryout an "american" (for lack of a better word) punishment or resolution I do not see it as a problem.

gatorboymike
01-11-2012, 06:10 PM
The problem with Sharia Law is that it is meant to be a code not only in the personal sense but in the legal, governmental sense as well. If it was meant to be something that Muslims just adhered to on a daily basis in their own lives, I wouldn't have a problem with it, just like I don't have a problem with Christians trying to live by the Ten Commandments on a daily basis in their own lives. However, just as we have Christian wackos trying to push the Ten Commandments into government (who, ironically enough, are usually the same ones who say the US system of government is already based on the Bible), Muslim wackos are obligated to try to push Sharia Law into government. Every country where the population is majority Muslim, Sharia Law is actual law, as in, enforced by the authorities and you can be imprisoned or killed for violating it. It is a religious code that is designed to be implemented into, or replace altogether, state government, therefore it poses a threat to separation of church and state, therefore it is both reasonable and necessary to ban it.