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duane1969
01-17-2012, 03:21 PM
One in every three adults and one in every six children in the United States is obese, according to the latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

These statistics, based on data from the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination, show little change compared to 12 years ago, although there have been increases in certain demographics, researchers said.

“There was an increase in males overall, especially adult males,” Dr. Cynthia Ogden, an epidemiologist and branch chief at the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics, told FoxNews.com. Ogden led the study along with Dr. Katherine Flegal, senior research scientist, and other colleagues at the CDC in Hyattsville, Md.


http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/01/17/cdc-1-in-3-adults-is-obese/?test=latestnews

I agree that America has a large number of obese people but I am not sure I buy the 1 in 3 aspect. I would buy that 1 in 3, even 2 in 4 are overweight, I just don't buy that 1/3rd of people are obese.

With that said, what is the core problem? It's not just overeating (not for all anyway). By definition I am obese but I do not overeat. My average daily caloric intake rides around 2000-2500 calories (I am only at 1070 so far today) but on some days dips to the 1500 range. My fat intake usually sits below 35g (I am at 18g so far today). Yet I have a hard time losing weight and have actually gained quite a bit in the last 6 months.

I have begun to honestly wonder if it is an issue with food additives such as steroids in meat, preservatives in veggies, etc. Our society has become more health aware, schools are serving healthier meals, adults are walking on lunch breaks and eating lighter meals, yet the number of obese people has remained stagnant for over a decade.

Star_Cards
01-17-2012, 03:25 PM
I'm sure these additives have some effect, but there are people that eat the same foods that are fit. I guess each body deals with different things differently, but I know that when I eat healthier and eat less I lose.

Diet is the main reason for being overweight or obese, but there really are a lot of people working desk jobs who aren't very active these days. I still think 1 in 3 being obese seems rather high. Although technically you don't have to be overweight by that much to be considered obese by definition, from what I've read.

shortking98
01-17-2012, 03:37 PM
First, to the OP, do not take this as a personal attack. My comments are about a general mindset and not your specific situation as I have no idea what that is.

IMO the core problem is poor diet and sedentary lifestyles. I agree to some extent about food additives possibly being harmful but I don't think that is the core issue here. Walking 1/4 mile during lunch hour isn't going to make up for sitting in an office all day and eating deep fried and processed foods. Everyone is looking for a magic solution, take this pill, don't eat bread on Thursdays etc. Whatever the flavor of the month fad is that's what people go for. To me, the solution is simple, eat healthy foods all the time (not a diet, a permanent change in lifestyle) and incorporate plenty of strenuous exercise. It's no coincidence that so many of the fad diets you see on TV advertise "No exercise required". People want results but aren't interested in putting in the effort required to get there.

ensbergcollector
01-17-2012, 03:37 PM
it's all those darn nfl players!

mrveggieman
01-17-2012, 03:38 PM
People aren't getting any exercise. I was chatting with someone on facebook the other day and they were talking about people paying money to ride the city bus one or two blocks because they were too lazy to walk. C'mon man.

moceanwerker
01-17-2012, 03:42 PM
Depends on how accurate you believe the BMI scale is, which is what the CDC uses to come up with these figures.

Is obesity in America a problem? Yes, I believe it is, regardless of what you consider "overweight" the statistics nonetheless point to everyone getting bigger.

I think this does correlate with additives and processed food - I think another big factor though is stress. Statistics also show that Americans are more stressed out on a level similar to obesity statistics...I wonder if there is a correlation?

Both parents working nowadays, fast/processed food is cheaper than from scratch meals, and many don't have the time to do this, much less monitor their health, or that of their childrens.

duane1969
01-17-2012, 03:46 PM
First, to the OP, do not take this as a personal attack. My comments are about a general mindset and not your specific situation as I have no idea what that is.

IMO the core problem is poor diet and sedentary lifestyles. I agree to some extent about food additives possibly being harmful but I don't think that is the core issue here. Walking 1/4 mile during lunch hour isn't going to make up for sitting in an office all day and eating deep fried and processed foods. Everyone is looking for a magic solution, take this pill, don't eat bread on Thursdays etc. Whatever the flavor of the month fad is that's what people go for. To me, the solution is simple, eat healthy foods all the time (not a diet, a permanent change in lifestyle) and incorporate plenty of strenuous exercise. It's no coincidence that so many of the fad diets you see on TV advertise "No exercise required". People want results but aren't interested in putting in the effort required to get there.

No offense taken. I have a "desk job" and don't get to be as active as I would like. In response to that I have changed my personal eating habits to try anhd compensate some. Deep fried is out. Cakes, cookies, chips, etc. are nearly non-existant. I eat lots of seafood and chicken. Red meats are almost always baked and chicken is often baked as well. Baked potatoes, green beans, peas and corn are typcial accompanyments. I just seem stuck.

I agree 110% that a sedintary lifestyle is a major contributor. I don't have the article to reference right now, but I read where the increase in obesity over the last few decades can be directly correlated to the increased frequency of the PC and gaming console in homes.

duane1969
01-17-2012, 03:52 PM
Depends on how accurate you believe the BMI scale is, which is what the CDC uses to come up with these figures.

Is obesity in America a problem? Yes, I believe it is, regardless of what you consider "overweight" the statistics nonetheless point to everyone getting bigger.

I think this does correlate with additives and processed food - I think another big factor though is stress. Statistics also show that Americans are more stressed out on a level similar to obesity statistics...I wonder if there is a correlation?

Both parents working nowadays, fast/processed food is cheaper than from scratch meals, and many don't have the time to do this, much less monitor their health, or that of their childrens.

This is a very good point. My son is living proof that the BMI scale is faulty. As a wrestler in high school last year he was 5'9", weighed 171 pounds and was ripped. He bench pressed 325# and squatted 475#. He set the school record for wins in a season, pins in a season, fastest pin and finished 5th at the state tournament. According to the BMI calculator his BMI is 25.2 making him just barely in the "overweight" category.

shortking98
01-17-2012, 03:58 PM
No offense taken. I have a "desk job" and don't get to be as active as I would like. In response to that I have changed my personal eating habits to try anhd compensate some. Deep fried is out. Cakes, cookies, chips, etc. are nearly non-existant. I eat lots of seafood and chicken. Red meats are almost always baked and chicken is often baked as well. Baked potatoes, green beans, peas and corn are typcial accompanyments. I just seem stuck.

I agree 110% that a sedintary lifestyle is a major contributor. I don't have the article to reference right now, but I read where the increase in obesity over the last few decades can be directly correlated to the increased frequency of the PC and gaming console in homes.

You are on the right track with those changes. Also, I would have to agree with you guys on the BMI as an indicator. On an individual scale it can be very misleading but on a national scale like this, I guess it at least gives you an idea of the problem even if it is probably not accurate for some groups (ex: athletic males).

DunkingDurant35
01-17-2012, 07:27 PM
I always thought caloric intake was the main factor - it was both in my weight gain (2007-08) and loss years (2008-09) - but if duane is calculating correctly, there must be other factors at play as well, at least for some people. Of course, exercise is a great adjunct, too, and not nearly enough people are as active as they should be.

I'm 5'2" 116 at the moment, within the normal range, and which is right around the weight I've been at most of my teenage and adult life save for those aforementioned years when I gained and lost 20+ pounds (highest weight was 139, 3 pounds overweight for my size, and I wasn't cardio0active or lifting weights then either like I do now).

tutall
01-17-2012, 07:40 PM
I totally believe the 1/3 are obese.... I know I fall into that catergory even though I am pretty athletic still and am in good shape to play basketball and football. I know I fall outside the ""obese" guidelines for my height and weight (6'6" 295lbs). I work in a place where I see 250-300 people per day minimum in a small town in Indiana and I would say a MINIMUM of half are overweight... Now mind you I am mainly seeing people during the day who are not working or on the government system which I can only assume would bea higher percentage of people who are obese/overweight but for everyone in Seattle who is lean and mean there are 3 people in Indiana who arent.

BGT Masters
01-17-2012, 09:51 PM
Laziness and over eating. Calories don't matter as much as you think if you off set it with an active lifestyle. It does depend on what type of calories you're taking in. Being actice id key. I prefer to push mow my yard over a rider, a split wood for neighbors by hand every year even though they have gas splitters, I play sports several times a week. Most people I know do absolutely nothing active. They consider playing video games as being active. I think we've grown too used to things that make life easier, and its made us weak and lazy. I believe the 1:3 statement. I admit my diet isn't the best but I do enough to stay in shape and make a conscious effort to do so.

Star_Cards
01-18-2012, 10:24 AM
I agree that you can offset with an active lifestyle. However if you are not fit and overweight to start with your calorie intake is the most important issue. If you are looking to lose weight and start working out a lot every day and still continue to each the same way and as many calories as you did before you probably aren't going to see many results.

True guys like Michael Phelps eat thousands of calories when training, but when you're obese or overweight to begin with you'll more than likely see more results by eating less and better calories. Bottom line it's best to do both if you want to lose, but get what you are saying about activity.

pghin08
01-18-2012, 11:19 AM
If Hostess ends up filing for Chapter 7, that'll help the obesity number fall.

BGT Masters
01-18-2012, 02:39 PM
I agree that you can offset with an active lifestyle. However if you are not fit and overweight to start with your calorie intake is the most important issue. If you are looking to lose weight and start working out a lot every day and still continue to each the same way and as many calories as you did before you probably aren't going to see many results.

True guys like Michael Phelps eat thousands of calories when training, but when you're obese or overweight to begin with you'll more than likely see more results by eating less and better calories. Bottom line it's best to do both if you want to lose, but get what you are saying about activity.

I still disagree. What type of foods you eat is more important than the calories they contain. One food with 300 calories might aid in fat burn while another may slow the metabolism. Eat less processed foods, that's a good start. Its all about jump starting your metabolism again. Find the foods that help the body instead of hinder it, walk around or just don't sit as much and you'll be surprised. If you sit too long your body stops producing a chemical which burns fat. Just merely standing instead of sitting all day helps as well.