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View Full Version : Employers are asking job applicants for facebook password



mrveggieman
03-20-2012, 09:01 AM
Your thoughts:

http://newhavenregister.com/articles/2012/03/20/news/doc4f68675cb640c456703943.txt

pghin08
03-20-2012, 10:18 AM
Dislike.

Star_Cards
03-20-2012, 10:58 AM
it's true that facebook has probably been a major factor for employers to decide who to hire. Most people are on their best behavior during interviews and facebook will give them a huge look at what type of person they are. They have zero right to ask for passwords.

I have a friend that dropped off of facebook a few weeks ago so I texted her to see what the deal was. She hid her account because she was trying to get a new job. She doesn't post a lot or anything that I would deem bad, but why risk it. Although if your facebook page is agreeable to the employer looking it may in fact land you the job over another person. It's a double edged sword for sure.

AUTaxMan
03-20-2012, 11:17 AM
I don't have a problem with it. You have no right to work for a particular employer. If they demand your password and you aren't willing to give it to them, work somewhere else.

Star_Cards
03-20-2012, 11:23 AM
I don't have a problem with it. You have no right to work for a particular employer. If they demand your password and you aren't willing to give it to them, work somewhere else.

I guess I can see that. They may have the right to ask to see your page but asking for a password where they could have access to private messages and access to your friends pages that may have security locks for non friends or security for certain pages or albums seems way extreme. I don't think I would give my password to a potential employer, even if it was a dream job. They don't need a password to look at your facebook page. I could see asking if they can see your page, but a password is rather over the top.

cavaliersfan30
03-20-2012, 11:29 AM
I hardly use facebook because of it, so much invasion of privacy today.....

mrveggieman
03-20-2012, 11:41 AM
I don't have a problem with it. You have no right to work for a particular employer. If they demand your password and you aren't willing to give it to them, work somewhere else.


So what would be out of bounds for an potential employer to ask of it's prospective employees? If the can ask for your facebook password, why not ask for your password to your bank account to make sure that you are not buying porn, alcohol, or donating to the wrong political party? Why not just give them the keys to your house and car so they can inspect it? Where does it stop?

ensbergcollector
03-20-2012, 11:55 AM
i think i could go for the idea of the companies that have asked you to friend someone at the company so they can check it out. No way i am handing over my password at the interview. You don't even work there yet.

AUTaxMan
03-20-2012, 11:58 AM
So what would be out of bounds for an potential employer to ask of it's prospective employees? If the can ask for your facebook password, why not ask for your password to your bank account to make sure that you are not buying porn, alcohol, or donating to the wrong political party? Why not just give them the keys to your house and car so they can inspect it? Where does it stop?

You tell them that you refuse to work for them. It really is that simple.

pghin08
03-20-2012, 12:00 PM
So what would be out of bounds for an potential employer to ask of it's prospective employees? If the can ask for your facebook password, why not ask for your password to your bank account to make sure that you are not buying porn, alcohol, or donating to the wrong political party? Why not just give them the keys to your house and car so they can inspect it? Where does it stop?

Totally agree. I have no problem with employers looking at Facebook when evaluating prospective employees, but that is stuff that you, as an individual, have submitted to the public domain. When they ask for your password, they then have access to stuff that you didn't deem suitable to be publicized. Not only that, they could literally edit things that you post, or things about yourself.

There has to be a line. Asking for the password certainly crosses it.

mrveggieman
03-20-2012, 12:01 PM
You tell them that you refuse to work for them. It really is that simple.


I would probably tell them a few more things that I can't say on SCF. :winking0071:

Wickabee
03-20-2012, 12:07 PM
You tell them that you refuse to work for them. It really is that simple.

It is that simple until one realizes that many people aren't in a position to be picky.
To be forced to hand over what is essentially personal information should be illegal.

duane1969
03-20-2012, 12:36 PM
Employers do not have the right to access personal info or use it as a factor for hiring. What I put on a Facebook page or Twitter has zero relevance to whether or not I can effectively do my job.

If my employer feels that they have the right to my personal info then I deserve the same respect. The same as they have a right to protect themselves from hiring a bad employee, I have the right to know that my job is secure because I am not working for a bad employer.

Wickabee
03-20-2012, 12:38 PM
employers do not have the right to access personal info or use it as a factor for hiring. What i put on a facebook page or twitter has zero relevance to whether or not i can effectively do my job.

If my employer feels that they have the right to my personal info then i deserve the same respect. The same as they have a right to protect themselves from hiring a bad employee, i have the right to know that my job is secure because i am not working for a bad employer.
preach!

AUTaxMan
03-20-2012, 01:31 PM
Employers do not have the right to access personal info or use it as a factor for hiring. What I put on a Facebook page or Twitter has zero relevance to whether or not I can effectively do my job.

If my employer feels that they have the right to my personal info then I deserve the same respect. The same as they have a right to protect themselves from hiring a bad employee, I have the right to know that my job is secure because I am not working for a bad employer.

You are absolutely right. In that case, you tell the employer to take a hike and that you are seeking employment elsewhere.

AUTaxMan
03-20-2012, 01:32 PM
It is that simple until one realizes that many people aren't in a position to be picky.
To be forced to hand over what is essentially personal information should be illegal.

That sucks for them. They should get a better skill set.

Star_Cards
03-20-2012, 01:36 PM
You tell them that you refuse to work for them. It really is that simple.

While I agree that people don't have the right to work for a specific company. A company doesn't have the right to ask certain questions or require certain information when determining if they want to hire someone. Asking for personal login passwords definitely oversteps a line.

AUTaxMan
03-20-2012, 01:38 PM
While I agree that people don't have the right to work for a specific company. A company doesn't have the right to ask certain questions or require certain information when determining if they want to hire someone. Asking for personal login passwords definitely oversteps a line.

Most states have employment-related privacy laws anyway, so if your current employer did it to you, then you could probably sue them.

mrveggieman
03-20-2012, 01:47 PM
That sucks for them. They should get a better skill set.


Easier said than done. You know that they are plenty of people with post grad degrees including law degrees that still cannot find work?

AUTaxMan
03-20-2012, 01:48 PM
Easier said than done. You know that they are plenty of people with post grad degrees including law degrees that still cannot find work?

I know it better than most.

Wickabee
03-20-2012, 01:49 PM
That sucks for them. They should get a better skill set.
Because it's just that easy...

mrveggieman
03-20-2012, 02:00 PM
I know it better than most.


So if someone can't get a job with a law degree what type of skill set do you suggest that they get?

AUTaxMan
03-20-2012, 02:07 PM
So if someone can't get a job with a law degree what type of skill set do you suggest that they get?

If you have a law degree, you should be able to get a job. Maybe not practicing law, but you are much more employable than the average joe with a bs in business management.

Wickabee
03-20-2012, 02:08 PM
If you have a law degree, you should be able to get a job. Maybe not practicing law, but you are much more employable than the average joe with a bs in business management.
...so "should" = "definitely will" now?

pghin08
03-20-2012, 03:30 PM
If you have a law degree, you should be able to get a job. Maybe not practicing law, but you are much more employable than the average joe with a bs in business management.

I'm kind of surprised you fall on this side of the argument. Where do you draw the line as a prospective employee?

BGT Masters
03-20-2012, 05:02 PM
Couldn't this just be used as a way/loophole to get around things that aren't allowed to be asked during/on an interview/application such as religion, marital status, sexual orientation, ect...........?

AUTaxMan
03-20-2012, 05:30 PM
I'm kind of surprised you fall on this side of the argument. Where do you draw the line as a prospective employee?

Not sure. It's like what Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart said about porn. I can't define it, but I know it when I see it.

Star_Cards
03-20-2012, 05:37 PM
I agree that an employer can use a facebook page that is public to determine if they should hire a perosn or not, but in no way should they be able to request a password for a personal account of any kind. Permission to look and permission to log into another person's account are two very different things.

PS... I would, however, have let my employer log in and adjust my NCAA brackets this year. They are terrible!!!

AUTaxMan
03-20-2012, 05:44 PM
I agree that an employer can use a facebook page that is public to determine if they should hire a perosn or not, but in no way should they be able to request a password for a personal account of any kind. Permission to look and permission to log into another person's account are two very different things.

PS... I would, however, have let my employer log in and adjust my NCAA brackets this year. They are terrible!!!

I don't think a current employer can. I think there are privacy laws against it. Not sure if there are laws about a prospective employer asking though. I would never give out that info.

shrewsbury
03-20-2012, 05:45 PM
what's next, email passwords, car keys, bank account numbers, SFC username and password?

i would not work for anyone who would want to know anything about my private life. i am a great employee and will work hard and long to get the job done, i will not rip you off, and work well by myself or with others.

what i do on my own time, is my personal business, not yours.

but i am employed, so if i was not and looking for work, perhaps i would think differently

Star_Cards
03-20-2012, 05:55 PM
I don't think a current employer can. I think there are privacy laws against it. Not sure if there are laws about a prospective employer asking though. I would never give out that info.

I would hope they wouldn't even be allowed to ask. In an interview situation, if the person really wants or needs the job you never know what sort of info one may hand out. I guess at that point there is responsibility on the individual but I don't then again they may feel that they have no choice to stay in the running for the job.