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View Full Version : pet peeve please tell me I'm not alone.



MattDMC
05-05-2012, 03:47 PM
Does anyone else get frustrated when going through buy/sell boards that nobody knows the difference between sell and sale?

For example
Huge collection for sell!"

or

"Have to sale my entire collection!"

I see these misused 100 times a day and it just makes me die a little inside.
People do realize they are two different words right?

I can understand people getting confused with their there they're and to too two but sale and sell should be pretty simple as they sound different from each other. You should just be able to read the sentence and you'd know if you used the correct "sale" or "sell".

Sorry long day just nitpicking a little bit :tongue0011:

rchurchward
05-05-2012, 04:42 PM
Trust me, as an English teacher, public forums make my brain hurt.

habsheaven
05-05-2012, 04:59 PM
I can't say that it bothers me enough to actually complain, but I do notice it quite often as well.

andrewhoya
05-05-2012, 05:26 PM
Drives me nuts. I have sympathy for our international members, though. Most are Americans, however.

JWinn
05-05-2012, 07:32 PM
No, your not alone Matt.

The "sell/sale" example is but one of many ways people err when posting. And its not limited to just posters on message boards.

But it can be funny.

My local paper, the Denver Post, has an online edition. The people who write for the paper make this kind of mistake on a daily basis. Yes, the people who are paid to write, as a profession, clearly did not make it thru basic English. Sad, but it is true.

What's funny about it is when it happens, it almost always draws comments from the people who post in the respond sections. And while berating the Post for it's uneducated writers, they make similar mistakes and prove they are no better than the writers.

I learned a long time ago when I first started communicating this way that if your going to correct someone else's grammar, or English, you better be perfect yourself.

Too many times I have watched a discussion turn from it's original topic into one about grammar, and everyone trying to prove how much smarter they are than everyone else.

And I share the peeve also. It's frustrating to read the NEWSPAPER, and have to wade thru the writer's mistakes and figure out what he or she is trying to say.

I tend to give everyone else, like people here, and people who post on AOL, The Post, or any message board, a pass. I mean, if professionals, who get paid to write for a living can't get it right, well, how can I expect anyone else to get it right?

As long as I understand what they are trying to say, I let it pass without comment.

Sure make you wonder though. I often think someone is just a kid, and doesn't know the difference between SALE and SELL yet. Then I come to find out they are 25 or 30, or even older.

I blame it on texting. Something I have yet to learn.

What drives me nuts is everyone who thinks U, UR, and the like are words. :twitch:

andrewhoya
05-05-2012, 07:54 PM
No, your not alone Matt.

The "sell/sale" example is but one of many ways people err when posting. And its not limited to just posters on message boards.

But it can be funny.

My local paper, the Denver Post, has an online edition. The people who write for the paper make this kind of mistake on a daily basis. Yes, the people who are paid to write, as a profession, clearly did not make it thru basic English. Sad, but it is true.

What's funny about it is when it happens, it almost always draws comments from the people who post in the respond sections. And while berating the Post for it's uneducated writers, they make similar mistakes and prove they are no better than the writers.

I learned a long time ago when I first started communicating this way that if your going to correct someone else's grammar, or English, you better be perfect yourself.

Too many times I have watched a discussion turn from it's original topic into one about grammar, and everyone trying to prove how much smarter they are than everyone else.

And I share the peeve also. It's frustrating to read the NEWSPAPER, and have to wade thru the writer's mistakes and figure out what he or she is trying to say.

I tend to give everyone else, like people here, and people who post on AOL, The Post, or any message board, a pass. I mean, if professionals, who get paid to write for a living can't get it right, well, how can I expect anyone else to get it right?

As long as I understand what they are trying to say, I let it pass without comment.

Sure make you wonder though. I often think someone is just a kid, and doesn't know the difference between SALE and SELL yet. Then I come to find out they are 25 or 30, or even older.

I blame it on texting. Something I have yet to learn.

What drives me nuts is everyone who thinks U, UR, and the like are words. :twitch:

You're. :tongue0011:

MattDMC
05-05-2012, 07:56 PM
You're. :tongue0011:


your two phunny :D:

JWinn
05-05-2012, 09:22 PM
You're. :tongue0011:

U R 2 Much! :D:

DunkingDurant35
05-05-2012, 09:29 PM
Trust me, as an English teacher, public forums make my brain hurt.

Same here, although I am technically still just a sub at this point. :)

97/98 SPX BK
06-01-2012, 03:23 AM
Thank you so much for starting this thread! Some valid points are being made here like many of our members being from foreign countries. I really feel for the English teachers here. I'm certainly not perfect but I do know the difference between your and you're, to too and two, there, their, and they're, etc. That's another one I see pretty frequently - "ect." rather than "etc." The word is "etcetera" or "et cetera".

I totally agree with the person who blames texting for a lot of this illiteracy. Our exposure to websites like craigslist and ebay are not helping things either. I'm convinced my IQ has dropped substantially since I began frequenting these sites but I love cards!

As far as I can tell SCF doesn't like us posting websites here but if you search google for Merriam Webster you'll find a site (not sight) that can really help out if you suspect that you might be misusing a word. If you don't feel like going to another website to learn what you should have learned in school at least take the time to watch the movie Idiocracy. It will show you what our society is heading toward :)

Frantiic
06-01-2012, 05:21 AM
i have problems with grammar aswell. im international but still. The there were where than then a an, their, they're etc.. back in school i was great in english. Graduated with A and A- on all classes, but i still have problems when it comes to writing alot in english.

captkirk42
06-01-2012, 11:08 AM
Thank you so much for starting this thread! Some valid points are being made here like many of our members being from foreign countries. I really feel for the English teachers here. I'm certainly not perfect but I do know the difference between your and you're, to too and two, there, their, and they're, etc. That's another one I see pretty frequently - "ect." rather than "etc." The word is "etcetera" or "et cetera".

I totally agree with the person who blames texting for a lot of this illiteracy. Our exposure to websites like craigslist and ebay are not helping things either. I'm convinced my IQ has dropped substantially since I began frequenting these sites but I love cards!

As far as I can tell SCF doesn't like us posting websites here but if you search google for Merriam Webster you'll find a site (not sight) that can really help out if you suspect that you might be misusing a word. If you don't feel like going to another website to learn what you should have learned in school at least take the time to watch the movie Idiocracy. It will show you what our society is heading toward :)

:clapping:
Well said. Those mistakes with Homophones (words like: there, they're and their) drive me nutty too (not two or to). I agree that "texting" is a big factor, but it is hand-in-hand with laziness and/or ignorance.

I also agree about when Professionals make simple grammar (not grammer) mistakes. I'm guessing that in today's "gotta have the latest and greatest right now and can't wait a second later" world and with everything relying on computers there are very little if any editors around anymore.

One of my other pet peeves with News articles, especially the online versions is the Misleading Headlines and the Teasing Headlines. OK I understand the concept of Using a teaser to lure a reader into reading your story. You gotta grab the readers attention and the Headline is your first chance to do that.

What I do not like though is when they assume everyone knows "Who" you are talking about because they are the current trending person/celeb. A headline like "Simpson does it again!" instantly annoys me because it isn't immediately known which Simpson you are talking about O.J.? Jessica? Also when the article doesn't match what the headline says or implies really gets me going. And if the article doesn't give me a brief synopsis in that first attention getting paragraph like it is supposed to I usually don't continue reading the dang thing.

Often the writers (or editors if they still exist) will try to be cute with a pun in the headline or paraphrase a famous saying or phrase or change a cliche slightly to make it a pun. I often do that as well, but sometimes you need to lay off it because it really isn't as cute, funny or good as you thought it was.

duane1969
06-01-2012, 11:38 AM
English teacher and self-proclaimed spelling Nazi here. You are not alone...

lambeauleap87
06-01-2012, 04:15 PM
It drives me insane, too...heck, I use proper grammar (commas, apostrophes, etc.) when texting. I'm more than willing to give those whose first language is not English a pass, but if you've taken English classes, speak the language, and grown up around it, you should have some semblance of grammar.

captkirk42
06-01-2012, 05:49 PM
It drives me insane, too...heck, I use proper grammar (commas, apostrophes, etc.) when texting. I'm more than willing to give those whose first language is not English a pass, but if you've taken English classes, speak the language, and grown up around it, you should have some semblance of grammar.

Exactly Bravo. Well played sir.

JWinn
06-01-2012, 06:08 PM
What really gets to me about all this is that most of these websites have a built in spellchecker.

If I type Speelchecker, it has a red line under it, telling me I am in error somehow. (Leaving that as an example.)


Drives me nuts when I can't figure it out, and have to google for correct spelling.


I make plenty of mistakes. I constantly switch letters. I forget what it's called, besides idiocy. :ashamed0001: I forget to capitalize often, and no doubt make plenty of other mistakes, but at least I try to make an attempt to be understood, and not look like a total fool in open public.

andrewhoya
06-02-2012, 08:19 AM
It drives me insane, too...heck, I use proper grammar (commas, apostrophes, etc.) when texting. I'm more than willing to give those whose first language is not English a pass, but if you've taken English classes, speak the language, and grown up around it, you should have some semblance of grammar.

here- a place.

hear- to listen.

Just thought I'd point it out since you've used it incorrectly twice recently. :horn:

lambeauleap87
06-02-2012, 11:20 AM
here- a place.

hear- to listen.

Just thought I'd point it out since you've used it incorrectly twice recently. :horn:

I screw that one up when I'm typing all the time...I'm not really sure why; it's an obvious one. I think my fingers get ahead of my brain sometime.

captkirk42
06-04-2012, 08:42 AM
What really gets to me about all this is that most of these websites have a built in spellchecker.

If I type Speelchecker, it has a red line under it, telling me I am in error somehow. (Leaving that as an example.)


Drives me nuts when I can't figure it out, and have to google for correct spelling.


I make plenty of mistakes. I constantly switch letters. I forget what it's called, besides idiocy. :ashamed0001: I forget to capitalize often, and no doubt make plenty of other mistakes, but at least I try to make an attempt to be understood, and not look like a total fool in open public.

I used to go to dictionary.com to find the correct spelling of things, but soon discovered that Google was much better, especially when your spelling is close to the proper spelling but not quite. Dictionary.com like many dictionaries don't really help much if your spelling of the word is too far off. For example spelling something with an "f" that should have the "ph" spelling.


I screw that one up when I'm typing all the time...I'm not really sure why; it's an obvious one. I think my fingers get ahead of my brain sometime.

It is also because many spell checkers just check the words not the grammar. Of course there are some spellcheckers that have grammar checking as well. Before I got into the checking Google habit I used to open up MSWord and use it's spellcheck/grammarcheck then cut and paste the correction, but that takes too long. Google appears to be the way to go now-days.

Triple Peanut
06-04-2012, 04:04 PM
Most of them have been covered, another mistake that bugs me is:
"would of" instead of "would have/would've".