PDA

View Full Version : Most unemployed Americans attended at least some college, for the first time ever



pwaldo
05-27-2012, 09:06 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/lookout/most-unemployed-americans-attended-least-college-first-time-152523538.html


For the first time in history, there are now more unemployed Americans who attended at least some college than people who only graduated high school or dropped out of high school, Bureau of Labor Statistics data show.

Seasonally unadjusted BLS data from April show that about 4.7 million of the nation's 9 million unemployed either graduated from a four-year or a two-year college program or attended college for some time before dropping out. A smaller 4.3 million share of America's unemployed graduated only from high school or didn't finish high school. Jed Graham from Investor's Business Daily graphed the change.

tutall
05-27-2012, 10:22 PM
Not surprising at all IMO. I see non-HS educated people daily working their butts off to keep a job while a lot of college education kids whine about not having a job and nothing in their field available instead of going out and finding something.

MadMan1978
05-28-2012, 08:21 AM
Not surprising at all IMO. I see non-HS educated people daily working their butts off to keep a job while a lot of college education kids whine about not having a job and nothing in their field available instead of going out and finding something.


Find what?

tutall
05-28-2012, 09:30 AM
Find what?

Just because you have a college degree does not make you above providing for your family... Deliver pizzas for all I care

MadMan1978
05-28-2012, 10:21 AM
Just because you have a college degree does not make you above providing for your family... Deliver pizzas for all I care


It is very obvious that you have never been in the situation.

First who says they are not providing for there family ?

Second, in most cases they are OVER QUALIFIED to deliver pizzas!

Fact is there are 30 people wanting that job...makes the market very tough...

I cannot count the time I have applied for certain positions and been told just that. Employers need people who are going to stick around. If they think you will bolt at the first real job offer they are not going to take the risk. It takes money to train people properly.

ensbergcollector
05-28-2012, 10:56 AM
i think there are a lot of factors to this. first of all, there are just more people with a college education in the work force then ever before. naturally the percentages would rise.

secondly, while there are people who are told they are overqualified for a position, there are a good number who only apply for jobs within their field or jobs that make over a certain amount of money.

MadMan1978
05-28-2012, 11:03 AM
i think there are a lot of factors to this. first of all, there are just more people with a college education in the work force then ever before. naturally the percentages would rise.

secondly, while there are people who are told they are overqualified for a position, there are a good number who only apply for jobs within their field or jobs that make over a certain amount of money.

yes that second part is true...When I was laid off I did that I wanted to stay in my field of course that is what i am train for. and of course I would hope i would have been able to stay at the same pay rate. The one part that stopped me is there were NO JOBS to even apply for...

tutall
05-28-2012, 11:03 AM
It is very obvious that you have never been in the situation.

First who says they are not providing for there family ?

Second, in most cases they are OVER QUALIFIED to deliver pizzas!

Fact is there are 30 people wanting that job...makes the market very tough...

I cannot count the time I have applied for certain positions and been told just that. Employers need people who are going to stick around. If they think you will bolt at the first real job offer they are not going to take the risk. It takes money to train people properly.

Maybe true in some parts of the country but where I live a college education is not really needed. There are few jobs around here that require anything more than a high school education and a lot that require just a GED. That being said I cannot tell you how many kids I have had in my office trying to figure out why they cannot find a job that uses their Art degree in this town. I do know of ton of people however that work at GM or the trailer factories that have college degrees ranging from mechanical engineering to marine mechanics and many many others.... They need to make money and dont really care about the piece of paper that hangs on the wall

hawk2618
05-28-2012, 11:05 AM
Isn't being told "you're overqualified" discrimination to some degree??? If I was heading a banking firm,and the bank went under for whatever reason and I had to take a job for half the pay and then applied to deliver pizzas for extra income,I'd get turned down for being "overqualified"?? Maybe one should lie about their background so they can get an extra income eh?

MadMan1978
05-28-2012, 11:22 AM
Isn't being told "you're overqualified" discrimination to some degree??? If I was heading a banking firm,and the bank went under for whatever reason and I had to take a job for half the pay and then applied to deliver pizzas for extra income,I'd get turned down for being "overqualified"?? Maybe one should lie about their background so they can get an extra income eh?


It isnt that simple as you would think

I even applied for a job a convince store! and I couldnt get the job...

and really it isnt discrimination. They view it this way

I can hire a person who has half the education, and they will stay around for a long period of time versus as person who has a good deal of education and is looking in their field and will quit at the hint of a better job.

redwingsfan11
05-28-2012, 11:47 AM
By viewing this conversation, I can't help but notice something that has always intrigued me and that is views based on one's location. Personally I have always wondered, is the job situation the same in one state than it is in another? It would be naive of me to only consider New York's situation (where i live) as to other states like ohio (random state i came up with off the top of my head). Certainly different states have different infrastructures, henceforth the majority of niches are different as well. One example I can think of off the top of my head is to imagine a town whose main niche is industrial work, a person who pursued an art degree because that was their lives passion (a duty to oneself) will have a hard time finding a job in such an environment. Furthermore, lets take the simple fact that as a society we have been trained to get a degree and search for jobs in that field, naturally one would make that their priority rather than search for any job. Now i agree that should an allotted amount of time pass that yield no results in finding a job in their field, for subsistence sake, one should find any job as a means their personal end.

I recognize that their are a few holes in my argument, that i dont feel like fixing as of now because Its memorial day and i want to go outside lol. But overall there are many factors that are involved with analyzing an entire nations job market/economy. But one question every person must pose themselves is, "do I stand by my passion or do i go where the money is"?

This is not an attack on anybody and I would love to hear any feedback or help fill the holes in my arguement (in a respectful manner mind you)

duane1969
05-28-2012, 02:40 PM
By viewing this conversation, I can't help but notice something that has always intrigued me and that is views based on one's location. Personally I have always wondered, is the job situation the same in one state than it is in another? It would be naive of me to only consider New York's situation (where i live) as to other states like ohio (random state i came up with off the top of my head). Certainly different states have different infrastructures, henceforth the majority of niches are different as well. One example I can think of off the top of my head is to imagine a town whose main niche is industrial work, a person who pursued an art degree because that was their lives passion (a duty to oneself) will have a hard time finding a job in such an environment. Furthermore, lets take the simple fact that as a society we have been trained to get a degree and search for jobs in that field, naturally one would make that their priority rather than search for any job. Now i agree that should an allotted amount of time pass that yield no results in finding a job in their field, for subsistence sake, one should find any job as a means their personal end.

I recognize that their are a few holes in my argument, that i dont feel like fixing as of now because Its memorial day and i want to go outside lol. But overall there are many factors that are involved with analyzing an entire nations job market/economy. But one question every person must pose themselves is, "do I stand by my passion or do i go where the money is"?

This is not an attack on anybody and I would love to hear any feedback or help fill the holes in my arguement (in a respectful manner mind you)

Want to work or don't want to work. That is essentially what you are saying and I agree. There are certainly instances where the work isn't avaialble, period. There are other instances where it is there but people consider it below them. My area falls into the second category. There are plenty of jobs if people want them, however there are plenty of people who are unemployed who refuse to work a job because it is manual labor or only pays $9 an hour.

In the last week both my 19 year old son and 16 year old daughter found fulltime work. Neither of them is getting rich, but if they had families then the jobs that they got would put food on the table and at least help keep the utility companies a little pacified until something better comes along. When I hear people in my area make excuses for not working I have to literally make an effort to not say something because I know that they are either lying about looking for work or refusing to take a job that they feel is below them. Either way I feel no sympathy for them.

----------------------------------------

As for the whole issue of more people than ever taking college classes, meh. In the long run all that does is devalue a BA/BS and it does nothing to help the shortage of workers to fill mid-level production jobs that require more than a high school diploma but less than a 4-year degree.

There is a Toyota plant on the west side of WV that is rumored to be in trouble because they can't find workers. They don't need people with 4-year degrees, they need people that can operate a lathe, read blueprints, repair machinery, do electrical repairs, etc. and they can't find those types of people. Everyone is either college educated or just has a high school diploma and those people are either overqualified or lack the training.

shrewsbury
05-28-2012, 05:29 PM
In the last week both my 19 year old son and 16 year old daughter found fulltime work. Neither of them is getting rich,

i am happy to here they found work!

Zimbow
05-28-2012, 11:04 PM
it is very obvious that you have never been in the situation.

First who says they are not providing for there family ?

Second, in most cases they are over qualified to deliver pizzas!

Fact is there are 30 people wanting that job...makes the market very tough...

I cannot count the time i have applied for certain positions and been told just that. Employers need people who are going to stick around. If they think you will bolt at the first real job offer they are not going to take the risk. It takes money to train people properly.

+1

Zimbow
05-28-2012, 11:08 PM
It isnt that simple as you would think

I even applied for a job a convince store! and I couldnt get the job...

and really it isnt discrimination. They view it this way

I can hire a person who has half the education, and they will stay around for a long period of time versus as person who has a good deal of education and is looking in their field and will quit at the hint of a better job.

The last sentence is so true. Before becoming an officer, I worked Security for a fortune 500 company here in Va. It's home office is in Florida and just built or revamped a new facility here. They hired all sorts of new people fresh out of school for IT work. As soon as a better job came around and they sniffed it, off they went. Which put the place here in a bind because they had a budget for the staff here. Happened far too often.

tpeichel
05-29-2012, 09:35 AM
Move to North Dakota.

The state's unemployment rate hovers around 3 percent, and "Help Wanted" signs litter the landscape of cities such as Williston in the same way "For Sale" signs populate the streets of Las Vegas (http://content.usatoday.com/topics/topic/Places,+Geography/Towns,+Cities,+Counties/Las+Vegas).
"It's a zoo," said Terry Ayers, who drove into town from Spokane, Wash., slept in his truck, and found a job within hours of arrival, tripling his salary. "It's crazy what's going on out here."

If you have a license and no criminal record, you can get a six-figure trucking job almost overnight. Real estate construction is almost as frenzied as the oil drilling, and there's even a huge business in housing the workers who don't have housing.

boba
05-29-2012, 11:58 AM
Has anyone else noticed that the value of collage is going down, but the price continues to go up?

I'm finishing up my junior year in high school right now and have decided to not go to collage once I graduate. I have seen so many of my friends go to collage right after graduating, only to finish and get the same job they would have without a degree, but are in tons of debt. Seems to me that in todays economy you have to start from the bottom up even if you have gone to collage. I'm not saying that a degree is worthless, as you have to have one to do many jobs, all I'm saying is it's way overvalued.

Also it seems today that many go to collage just for a couple more years of not working.

tpeichel
05-29-2012, 12:06 PM
Has anyone else noticed that the value of collage is going down, but the price continues to go up?

I'm finishing up my junior year in high school right now and have decided to not go to collage once I graduate. I have seen so many of my friends go to collage right after graduating, only to finish and get the same job they would have without a degree, but are in tons of debt. Seems to me that in todays economy you have to start from the bottom up even if you have gone to collage. I'm not saying that a degree is worthless, as you have to have one to do many jobs, all I'm saying is it's way overvalued.

Also it seems today that many go to collage just for a couple more years of not working.

Smart. You can always work and save money then use that money to get additional training or a degree that will make you more valuable in the marketplace.

boba
05-29-2012, 12:24 PM
Smart. You can always work and save money then use that money to get additional training or a degree that will make you more valuable in the marketplace.

Exactly my thoughts, if I need the degree to move up, I will have money saved up to pay for a good portion.