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theonedru
08-17-2012, 12:56 PM
His name is Paul Corby, he is 23 years old and because he was born with left ventricular noncompaction, which mean the left side of his heart cannot sufficiently pump blood. He was also born with Pervasive Developmental Disorder making him autistic and because of this the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania had decided to not give Paul his life saving transplant. I am not writing this so we can blame the left or right or this person or that person or to have this thread degenerate the way a thread here normally goes. I am asking that you please sign the petition so that Paul can have a chance to live. Just think if you know someone with autism they to can be denied a life saving transplant. Thank you to all who help support Paul.

http://www.change.org/petitions/help-my-autistic-son-get-a-life-saving-heart-transplant

http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg244/TheOneDru/paulcorby.jpg

ensbergcollector
08-17-2012, 01:03 PM
are you stinking kidding me? because he has autism they won't give him a transplant? i am against whoever came up with that idea regardless of party or anything else. that is just flat out wrong!!!

drtom2005
08-17-2012, 01:08 PM
are you stinking kidding me? because he has autism they won't give him a transplant? i am against whoever came up with that idea regardless of party or anything else. that is just flat out wrong!!!

It is not that simple. With most transplants(except kidneys), people need to take immunosuppressants. Part of getting an organ is if the patient will take his medicine. If his behavioral disorder is too severe, he may refuse to take the medicine. Organs are hard to get. People have to be compliant to get them, since they are so rare.

They do pyschiatry evals on patients with schizophenia and bipolar all of the time before they can get a transplant. Because he has an autism spectrum disorder, he gets to be special?

habsheaven
08-17-2012, 01:09 PM
I signed the petition. I would be interested in knowing exactly what the hospital committee had to say about this, although I can't imagine there is a valid excuse for it.

angel0430
08-17-2012, 01:14 PM
It is not that simple. With most transplants(except kidneys), people need to take immunosuppressants. Part of getting an organ is if the patient will take his medicine. If his behavioral disorder is too severe, he may refuse to take the medicine. Organs are hard to get. People have to be compliant to get them, since they are so rare.

I am pretty sure that his mother and family is going to make sure that he takes his medicine. This is something that you do not use general data. You need to go on a case by case basis. has he been taking his medicines so far? This are the questions you need to ask. The doctors know how good or bad he can be when taking medicines or treatments.

drtom2005
08-17-2012, 01:20 PM
I am pretty sure that his mother and family is going to make sure that he takes his medicine. This is something that you do not use general data. You need to go on a case by case basis. has he been taking his medicines so far? This are the questions you need to ask. The doctors know how good or bad he can be when taking medicines or treatments.

Yeah, and kids/adults with autism sometimes refuse to take their medicine. I'm siding with the hospital on this one unless more data comes out.

theonedru
08-17-2012, 01:25 PM
If this guy can write a book I think he can take his medicines.....

Seriously the guy is an author of a children's book

http://www.amazon.com/Isaac-Runner-Paul-Corby/dp/0578104504

drtom2005
08-17-2012, 01:30 PM
If this guy can write a book I think he can take his medicines.....

Seriously the guy is an author of a children's book

http://www.amazon.com/Isaac-Runner-Paul-Corby/dp/0578104504

That has nothing to do with medicine compliance. It's not if he can understand how to take medicine, it is if he will take it.

theonedru
08-17-2012, 01:33 PM
It is not that simple. With most transplants(except kidneys), people need to take immunosuppressants. Part of getting an organ is if the patient will take his medicine. If his behavioral disorder is too severe, he may refuse to take the medicine. Organs are hard to get. People have to be compliant to get them, since they are so rare.

They do pyschiatry evals on patients with schizophenia and bipolar all of the time before they can get a transplant. Because he has an autism spectrum disorder, he gets to be special?

An autistic girl was refused a kidney transplant because of her autism as well not sure if it was by the same hospital

drtom2005
08-17-2012, 01:37 PM
An autistic girl was refused a kidney transplant because of her autism as well not sure if it was by the same hospital

It is not about the autism, ultimately. It is if the person will take the medicine. They are plenty of examples of people with different mental illinesses(bipolar, schizophrenia, etc) not getting transplants, because their disease was not under control.

Would you say the same thing about a non-medicine compliant schizophrenic (he may or may not have his autism under control, I do not know)? I surely would not want them getting an organ. They are too rare right now.

drtom2005
08-17-2012, 02:00 PM
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/autistic-man-denied-heart-transplant-upenn-hospital/story?id=17006152

Denials come because organs are a scarce resource, with three to four times as many people who need transplants as there are organs available. As such, he said, doctors look for transplant candidates to have good expected outcomes. For example, a dying patient who has a 1 percent chance of survival with a new organ would not be a good candidate because that organ could have gone to someone who could have lived a full life with it, he said.

The patient has to be able to take care of the new organ or have a support group to ensure that the organ doesn't go to waste, which can be an issue with mental illness, addiction and even autism, he said.

"I have never since 1995 seen that decision made in a cavalier fashion," Cronin said. "These decisions are not made in isolation. They're not made easily … We know the outcome is if someone is denied a transplant."

As of 7:54 a.m. this morning, there were 114,852 people on the national list, according to the UNOS website. From January to May of this year, 11,468 transplants were performed, it said.

ensbergcollector
08-17-2012, 02:08 PM
i am fully aware that there are other issues involved in deciding this. My issue was if his autism alone ruled him out, i would have a major issue with it. You are right that if there are things we don't know, my opinion might change.

theonedru
08-17-2012, 06:36 PM
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/autistic-man-denied-heart-transplant-upenn-hospital/story?id=17006152

Denials come because organs are a scarce resource, with three to four times as many people who need transplants as there are organs available. As such, he said, doctors look for transplant candidates to have good expected outcomes. For example, a dying patient who has a 1 percent chance of survival with a new organ would not be a good candidate because that organ could have gone to someone who could have lived a full life with it, he said.

The patient has to be able to take care of the new organ or have a support group to ensure that the organ doesn't go to waste, which can be an issue with mental illness, addiction and even autism, he said.

"I have never since 1995 seen that decision made in a cavalier fashion," Cronin said. "These decisions are not made in isolation. They're not made easily … We know the outcome is if someone is denied a transplant."

As of 7:54 a.m. this morning, there were 114,852 people on the national list, according to the UNOS website. From January to May of this year, 11,468 transplants were performed, it said.



Then anyone with a history of eating fast food, unhealthy food, drinking, not exercising basically keeping their bodies in poor health then should also be denied the same procedure because they have already proven their ignorance in keeping themselves healthy thus unworthy of a new organ since they will prob continue doing either the same bad thing/s or replace an old bad habit with a new bad habit.

Wickabee
08-17-2012, 06:47 PM
Then anyone with a history of eating fast food, unhealthy food, drinking, not exercising basically keeping their bodies in poor health then should also be denied the same procedure because they have already proven their ignorance in keeping themselves healthy thus unworthy of a new organ since they will prob continue doing either the same bad thing/s or replace an old bad habit with a new bad habit.

Not taking your medication because you're autistic is not a bad habit.

theonedru
08-17-2012, 06:57 PM
Not taking your medication because you're autistic is not a bad habit.

I know it shows how hypocritical people are when arguing stuff like this, A guy like Paul who MIGHT NOT take his meds in comparison to some glutton who ruined his own body is deemed more worthy of a transplant, I do not think so. I want Paul to have an equal and honest chance at life as the rest.

drtom2005
08-19-2012, 08:59 PM
I know it shows how hypocritical people are when arguing stuff like this, A guy like Paul who MIGHT NOT take his meds in comparison to some glutton who ruined his own body is deemed more worthy of a transplant, I do not think so. I want Paul to have an equal and honest chance at life as the rest.


It's not hypocritical. First, because of the HIPPA law, we do not know why he was denied. Second, to get a transplant, a person must not smoke or drink for 6 months. Also, they have to do everything the doctor says to show compliance. It is fair standard to get an organ.

The issue I have with this is the mother is saying he isn't getting the organ because of his autism. If this is true, it is wrong. If she is not telling us something, like he refused to do a pre-procedure test or take some medicine, it is making all people with autism look bad.