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View Full Version : 500,000 Iraqi civilians flee Mosul fighting, Al Qaeda splinter group seizes cities



GroundSupport
06-11-2014, 01:43 PM
(CNN) -- A day after taking over Iraq's second-largest city, Mosul, militants gained nearly complete control of the northern city of Tikrit, witnesses in the city and police officials in neighboring Samarra told CNN.
Heavy fighting erupted inside Tikrit -- the hometown of former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein -- as the military tried to regain control of the city, the sources and a police official in Baghdad said.
According to the witnesses in Tikrit and the Samarra police officials, two police stations in Tikrit had been set on fire and a military base taken over by militants, who are believed to be from the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, an al Qaeda splinter group also known as ISIS and ISIL.
The governor of Salaheddin province, of which Tikrit is the capital, was missing, according to the Tikrit and Samarra sources.

Suspected ISIS militants raided the Turkish Embassy in Mosul on Wednesday, capturing 48 people, including diplomats. They also seized parts of Baiji, the site of Iraq's largest oil refinery, police officials in Tikrit told CNN earlier.
Meanwhile, explosions struck three Shiite areas in Baghdad on Wednesday, killing 25 people and injuring 56, police officials told CNN. The deadliest attack was in Sadr City, where a car bomb exploded near a funeral tent, killing 15 people and wounding 34, police said.
The clashes come on the heels of a sudden and danger-fraught exodus from the fighting in Mosul, which fell to militants Tuesday.
More than 500,000 people have fled the fighting there, the International Organization for Migration said Wednesday.
The group, whose teams have been monitoring the plight of those caught in the onslaught, said the violence had resulted in "a high number of casualties among civilians."
The northern city's four main hospitals are inaccessible because of fighting, and some mosques have been converted for use as clinics, the IOM said.
Those fleeing the fighting, in vehicles or on foot, some bringing only what they can carry in plastic bags, are heading to the city's east or seeking sanctuary elsewhere in Nineveh province or in Iraq's Kurdish region.
The rush led to bottlenecks at checkpoints Tuesday as people tried to reach safety in nearby Erbil.
Despite its size -- the predominantly Sunni city has a population of about 1.6 million -- Mosul's collapse was swift. After weekend clashes, hundreds of radical Islamist fighters swarmed through the west of the city overnight Monday to Tuesday.
American-trained Iraqi government forces fled in the face of the onslaught by the suspected ISIS fighters. The militants now control most, if not all, of the city.
Iraq's parliamentary speaker was scathing. "The (Iraqi) forces abandoned their weapons and the commanders fled, leaving behind weapons, armored vehicles. Their positions were easy prey for terrorists."
On Wednesday, Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki ordered that all military leaders who fled be court-martialed.
The heavily armed radicals overran police stations, freed more than 1,000 prisoners from the city jail and captured the city's international airport.

Turkish Special Forces members, consulate workers and three children were among those detained and taken to the ISIS headquarters following a raid on the Turkish Consulate in Mosul on Wednesday morning, Turkish officials told CNN.
"The condition of the Turkish citizens is fine, developments are being monitored," the officials said. "It is a quite fragile situation, but hopefully we will resolve it today or in a couple days."
No one has been killed or injured, they added.
The raid was not the first incident to involve Turkey. Turkey's Foreign Ministry said Tuesday that militants abducted 28 Turkish truck drivers hauling fuel from Turkey to a plant in Mosul.
The Kurdish regional prime minister -- whose ethnic Kurdish forces reach the eastern outskirts of Mosul, capital of Nineveh province -- blamed Iraq's leadership for the city's collapse.
"Over the last two days, we tried extremely hard to establish cooperation with the Iraqi Security Forces in order to protect the city of Mosul. Tragically, Baghdad adopted a position which has prevented the establishment of this cooperation," Nechirvan Barzani said in a statement Tuesday.

Oil town under attack
Meanwhile, suspected ISIS militants on Wednesday seized parts of Baiji, a small Iraqi town in Salaheddin province about 200 kilometers (125 miles) north of the capital, Baghdad, police officials in Tikrit told CNN.
The Baiji oil refinery -- Iraq's largest -- is still under the control of Iraqi security forces, officials said.
The fact that ISIS forces are trying to take the town will worry the oil industry in Iraq but also suggests a wider strategic aim.
Baiji sits on the main highway north from Baghdad to Mosul -- a road that passes through rural areas in which ISIS has a lot of influence.
For the government to reinforce its troops in Mosul, it needs to drive them through Baiji. If ISIS controls the town, or at least can pour firepower on the highway, it will make it much harder for the government to give that support.
The move into Salaheddin province shows how close the major fighting is getting to Baghdad.
In the Baghdad area, a car bomb exploded at a funeral in the suburb of Sadr City on Wednesday, killing three and wounding eight, according to police officials in Baghdad.

Discontent feeds violence
In his weekly address to the nation Wednesday, al-Maliki described the assault on Mosul as a "conspiracy" to destabilize the country and called on Iraqis to "stand as one united front."
He also praised the people of Nineveh province for volunteering to take up arms against ISIS and promised to "cleanse Nineveh from these terrorists."
A day earlier, the Prime Minister asked for parliament to declare a state of emergency and for volunteers to pick up guns and bolster the army. He also requested help from the international community.
Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr said in a statement Wednesday that he is ready to form a "peace brigade" to work in coordination with the Iraqi government "to defend the holy places" of Muslims and Christians.
But this brigade probably would be viewed by many as a resurgence of al-Sadr's Mahdi Army, the powerful Shia militia formerly active in Sadr City and officially disbanded at the end of 2008.
Its formation could risk worsening the country's underlying problem -- festering sectarian division.
The country's minority Sunni population, which prospered under Hussein, feels shut out by al-Maliki's Shia majority-dominated government.
It's a discontent that feeds growing sectarian tensions that find expression in multiple daily car bombings and suicide attacks.
On Saturday, there were six roadside bombings in Baghdad alone, in which 33 people were reported killed and 72 wounded.
The devastating ISIS advance, which had been building for some time, is proving an object lesson of much that is wrong in Iraq and the region -- with a festering civil war over the border in Syria adding fuel to the growing sectarian tensions at home.
ISIS is exploiting this to expand its influence, from cities like Falluja and parts of Ramadi that it wrested from the government in Anbar early this year, and from Syrian towns like Raqqa it controls over the border.
A U.S. counterterrorism official told CNN that ISIS had been active in Nineveh province "for a long time and clearly sensed that Mosul was vulnerable now after engaging in sporadic attacks earlier this year.
"Strategically, the group looks at Syria and Iraq as one interchangeable battlefield, and its ability to shift resources and personnel across the border has measurably strengthened its position in both theaters."
However, the official said, despite the territorial advances it has made in Sunni-dominated Anbar and Nineveh provinces, ISIS still has "significant weaknesses."
"It has shown little ability to govern effectively, is generally unpopular and has no sway outside the Sunni community in either Iraq or Syria."

Too radical for al Qaeda
The more the Sunnis feel they are being abandoned by their Shia-dominated government, the harder any political rapprochement, and therefore peace, will be.
ISIS is exploiting this weakness. It is considered too radical even for al Qaeda and in the past months has withstood and emerged from a jihadist backlash from within the ranks of its erstwhile radical Islamist allies in Syria's civil war.
That it is capable of fighting the forces of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad on one hand, its fellow radicals on another, and the Iraqi government on top of that -- where it is winning significant battles and scoring massive weapons hauls -- is an indication of the depth to which ISIS has established itself in the region.
According to the United Nations, last year was Iraq's most violent in five years, with more than 8,800 people killed, most of them civilians.
This year, almost half a million people have been displaced from their homes in central Anbar province.

Fighting skills
ISIS grew out of al Qaeda in Iraq. In the west of Iraq, its militants were responsible for the deaths and maiming of many U.S. troops. In 2006, their commander -- the bloodthirsty Abu Musab al-Zarqawi -- was killed in a U.S. strike.
In the ensuing years, with American help, Iraqi tribal militias put the al Qaeda upstart on the defensive.
But when U.S. troops left, the extremist militants returned, found new leadership, went to Syria, grew stronger, and came back to Iraq, making military gains often off the backs of foreign fighters drawn to Syria's conflict.
They came to Syria's civil war better equipped and trained than most jihadists, with skills learned fighting in Iraq. They exploited their advantage, charting a course directed by a vision for a regional caliphate.
Mosul has not just helped fill their war chest, it has made them the single most dangerous destabilizing radical group in the region -- something the Iraqi government seems ill-equipped to deal with.
The siege of Mosul: What's happening? Why is it significant? (http://www.cnn.com/2014/06/11/world/meast/iraq-mosul-explainer/index.html)


Interesting.

pwaldo
06-11-2014, 10:33 PM
Not really shocking at all. The dictators kept the terrorists down and now that the dictators are all mostly gone the terrorists are running wild.

GroundSupport
06-12-2014, 09:58 AM
Yep, now they are going to over throw Baghdad.

Expect the same in Afghanistan when we pull out.

Star_Cards
06-12-2014, 10:00 AM
The News were calling them terrorists as they are backed by the Taliban (not to get into a terrorist or not discussion again), but it kind of seems like lots of Sunni vs Shiite fighting. Shiites took over after Saddam and kept the Sunni's out of power. Now they want to retake control. Seems like a no win situation. These two sides are almost breed to hate each other. It's hard to see an end game where they coexist. Seems like a situation similar to Isreal and Palestine.

GroundSupport
06-12-2014, 10:08 AM
Al Qaeda backed.

Star_Cards
06-12-2014, 10:12 AM
Al Qaeda backed.

yeah. that's what I meant to say.

duane1969
06-12-2014, 10:38 AM
The News were calling them terrorists as they are backed by the Taliban (not to get into a terrorist or not discussion again), but it kind of seems like lots of Sunni vs Shiite fighting. Shiites took over after Saddam and kept the Sunni's out of power. Now they want to retake control. Seems like a no win situation. These two sides are almost breed to hate each other. It's hard to see an end game where they coexist. Seems like a situation similar to Isreal and Palestine.

The ignorant part is they are literally divide on the most minimal of issues. The whole dispute is because the Sunni think anyone should be able to hold the high office in Islam and the Shia think that only a descendent of Mohammed should be able to hold the high office. The Sunni wanted Mohammed's father-in-law to get the office and the Shia wanted Mohammed's nephew Ali to get it. That is how this whole mess between them got started and they have been killing each other over it for 1600 years.

Star_Cards
06-12-2014, 11:25 AM
The ignorant part is they are literally divide on the most minimal of issues. The whole dispute is because the Sunni think anyone should be able to hold the high office in Islam and the Shia think that only a descendent of Mohammed should be able to hold the high office. The Sunni wanted Mohammed's father-in-law to get the office and the Shia wanted Mohammed's nephew Ali to get it. That is how this whole mess between them got started and they have been killing each other over it for 1600 years.

interesting. and sad.

GroundSupport
06-13-2014, 10:59 AM
Baghdad will fall soon.


Good thing we pulled out!

mrveggieman
06-13-2014, 12:41 PM
We should have never got involved with those people's business in the first place.

GroundSupport
06-13-2014, 12:56 PM
We should have never got involved with those people's business in the first place.

Last time I checked, Obama didn't do much of anything with Syria. Hence the problem.

mrveggieman
06-13-2014, 01:04 PM
Last time I checked, Obama didn't do much of anything with Syria. Hence the problem.


What did that remark have to do with bush's iraq war?

sanfran22
06-13-2014, 02:36 PM
What did that remark have to do with bush's iraq war?

So should I start saying Wilson's WW1? FDR's WW2?, How about LBJ's vietnam war? Truman's Korean war. I mean, come on. I know your anti republican but if you want to play that game, go look at wars started/entered into to by dems. Your war mongering comments about the repubs don't really tread water.....

mrveggieman
06-13-2014, 02:38 PM
So should I start saying Wilson's WW1? FDR's WW2?, How about LBJ's vietnam war? Truman's Korean war. I mean, come on. I know your anti republican but if you want to play that game, go look at wars started/entered into to by dems. Your war mongering comments about the repubs don't really tread water.....

I wasn't alive when any of those wars were started. I was alive when both bushes started wars in the middle east and I am going to call them out on them.

sanfran22
06-13-2014, 02:41 PM
I wasn't alive when any of those wars were started. I was alive when both bushes started wars in the middle east and I am going to call them out on them.

But you don't call out Obama for continuing and adding to afghanistan. Or Clinton for his Iraq efforts. WHo cares if you were alive, you have said that republicans were warmongers before on this site. I was simply pointing out how wrong you were (per the norm).

mrveggieman
06-13-2014, 02:45 PM
But you don't call out Obama for continuing and adding to afghanistan. Or Clinton for his Iraq efforts. WHo cares if you were alive, you have said that republicans were warmongers before on this site. I was simply pointing out how wrong you were (per the norm).

I thought that we wern't allowed to talk about retired presidents. That is why I don't talk about clinton that much. Or is it only your mesiah gwb that you don't want us to say anything negative about? Most republicans are indeed war mongers. There are some dems who are also war mongers such as hillary clinton. I am surprised that you don't like her. She is nothing but a republican pretending to be a dem.

sanfran22
06-13-2014, 02:47 PM
I thought that we wern't allowed to talk about retired presidents. That is why I don't talk about clinton that much. Or is it only your mesiah gwb that you don't want us to say anything negative about? Most republicans are indeed war mongers. There are some dems who are also war mongers such as hillary clinton. I am surprised that you don't like her. She is nothing but a republican pretending to be a dem.

You bring up a "retired" president all the time. In fact, just a few posts ago. Last I checked, Obama isn't retired yet. I think there were more deaths in afghanistan under him then Bush. You apparently don't know what a warmonger is.

mrveggieman
06-13-2014, 02:52 PM
You bring up a "retired" president all the time. You apparently don't know what a warmonger is.

This guy right here:

http://michaelmurray.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/George-W-Bush-Cheerleader.jpg

sanfran22
06-13-2014, 02:57 PM
82423
Don't forget this guy!!!!

GroundSupport
06-13-2014, 03:17 PM
What did that remark have to do with bush's iraq war?



Of course you dont know what ISIS means or who they are..

Typical.

mrveggieman
06-13-2014, 03:18 PM
82423
Don't forget this guy!!!!

What war did he start again?

GroundSupport
06-13-2014, 03:22 PM
What war did he start again?

The one thats now going on in Iraq because he pulled out so fast and did nothing to stop the conflict in Syria.

mrveggieman
06-13-2014, 03:44 PM
The one thats now going on in Iraq because he pulled out so fast and did nothing to stop the conflict in Syria.

No your buddy started the mess in Iraq. And tell me more about how Obama is the President of Syria and it is his responsibility to clean their mess up.

GroundSupport
06-13-2014, 03:52 PM
No your buddy started the mess in Iraq. And tell me more about how Obama is the President of Syria and it is his responsibility to clean their mess up.

Its like debating with a 12 year old.

He pulled the troops out Iraq when he was advised against it. Do we still have troops in Japan? Yes. Troops in Germany? Yes.

As for Syria, he could have took action but now those same guys are in Iraq trying to over throw Iraq.

Guess what. News Flash. The war on terrorism isnt over. I know your boy Barrack made you believe otherwise. Thats why Syria is our problem.

GroundSupport
06-16-2014, 09:44 AM
So how does Obama intend to solve this Problem?

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/06/16/us-weighs-alliance-with-iran-to-counter-isis-boosts-presence-in-gulf/


This guy is a complete utter moron. Is he purposely trying to ruin the United States of America?

pwaldo
06-17-2014, 06:14 PM
So how does Obama intend to solve this Problem?

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/06/16/us-weighs-alliance-with-iran-to-counter-isis-boosts-presence-in-gulf/

This guy is a complete utter moron. Is he purposely trying to ruin the United States of America?

Are the guys who are now running around in Iraq the same terrorists that Obama was supporting in Syria? I don't even know anymore who is what or whatever in that region but I'm glad that Congress said no to Obama giving more support to the rebels because the last thing we need is another country where the leaders are toppled so that it can be overrun with terrorists.

JustAlex
06-17-2014, 09:46 PM
Wait....does anyone hear that....

There it is again!

Yup...it's Conservatives beating the drums of war!

Wah, Obama spends too much money....

Wah, we MUST stop spending...

Oh, but PLEASE lets go to war, PLEASE let's spend Billions of dollars and who knows how many young lives in conflicts which are unwinnable...

Conservatives.....the textbook definition of hypocrisy.

ajcorleone
06-17-2014, 09:52 PM
Obama is a conservative?? Hmm that's a good one
Wait....does anyone hear that....

There it is again!

Yup...it's Conservatives beating the drums of war!

Wah, Obama spends too much money....

Wah, we MUST stop spending...

Oh, but PLEASE lets go to war, PLEASE let's spend Billions of dollars and who knows how many young lives in conflicts which are unwinnable...

Conservatives.....the textbook definition of hypocrisy.

JustAlex
06-17-2014, 10:08 PM
Obama is a conservative?? Hmm that's a good one
Your buddies are the ones all over the news begging to go to yet another unwinnable conflict...

GroundSupport
06-18-2014, 09:56 AM
Wait....does anyone hear that....

There it is again!

Yup...it's Conservatives beating the drums of war!

Wah, Obama spends too much money....

Wah, we MUST stop spending...

Oh, but PLEASE lets go to war, PLEASE let's spend Billions of dollars and who knows how many young lives in conflicts which are unwinnable...

Conservatives.....the textbook definition of hypocrisy.


I'll be sure to look you up when 9/11 happens again. Because by then, you will be choking on the crow and won't have anything to say.

I know, you were still sucking on your thumb when 9/11 happened.


Good thing we spent a billion on a website so people like you can get affordable healthcare though.

GroundSupport
06-18-2014, 09:58 AM
Your buddies are the ones all over the news begging to go to yet another unwinnable conflict...

The War on Terrorism isn't over. I guess it needs to hit home before you can understand that.

Wickabee
06-18-2014, 01:33 PM
The War on Terrorism isn't over. I guess it needs to hit home before you can understand that.

Do you expect to win such a war?

JustAlex
06-18-2014, 03:44 PM
I'll be sure to look you up when 9/11 happens again. Because by then, you will be choking on the crow and won't have anything to say.

I know, you were still sucking on your thumb when 9/11 happened.


Good thing we spent a billion on a website so people like you can get affordable healthcare though.
Spoken like a true neo-con...

Start warmongering and when people say NO, threaten them with something horrible.

Yum, yum, yum....how we love war!

How we LOVE to spend Billions on stupid things which only make things worse...

sanfran22
06-18-2014, 03:54 PM
Spoken like a true neo-con...

Start warmongering and when people say NO, threaten them with something horrible.

Yum, yum, yum....how we love war!

How we LOVE to spend Billions on stupid things which only make things worse...

Like Healthcare.gov?

sanfran22
06-18-2014, 03:55 PM
Do you expect to win such a war?

I would say it would be a near impossible task....

GroundSupport
06-18-2014, 03:57 PM
Spoken like a true neo-con...

Start warmongering and when people say NO, threaten them with something horrible.

Yum, yum, yum....how we love war!

How we LOVE to spend Billions on stupid things which only make things worse...

It's a very sad when people risk/give their lives against terrorism/enemies to protect low lifes like you.

I'm ashamed to have serve this country because of people like you.

You're exactly what is wrong with this country.

But Be Proud, Be Entitled. Someone else will earn it for you. We'll pick up your slack and protect you.

GroundSupport
06-18-2014, 03:58 PM
I would say it would be a near impossible task....

It is. Would you agree that our best defense is being on the offense? We all know what happened the last time we had our guard down.

JustAlex
06-18-2014, 04:46 PM
It's a very sad when people risk/give their lives against terrorism/enemies to protect low lifes like you.

I'm ashamed to have serve this country because of people like you.

You're exactly what is wrong with this country.
Is this all you can do throw ad hominems instead of properly attacking my comments head on?

You defeat yourself in this manner.

Let me know when you have something substantive instead of just personal insults...

GroundSupport
06-18-2014, 05:38 PM
The Entitlement Generation.

ajcorleone
06-18-2014, 05:52 PM
That nails it. We have kids on here who are bookworms and believe what they are spoon fed from the "rebellious" folk. They consider themselves smart and independent because they believe in a cause they find on you tube or facebook.Just like war protest in the 70's, 80's baby boomers and so on this generation is living in the now and think they have it solved.War is an unfortunate act that causes many lives to be lost and money to be spent.And it has been going on since the dawn of whatever you believe in. This generation reminds me of Moneyball and Billy Beane.You found a great concept and it works to an extent and look great on paper but has it brought you a world title????? Not saying we have to live the same old same old but war is going to happen so we have to prepare to defend against it.
The Entitlement Generation.

Wickabee
06-18-2014, 06:00 PM
I would say it would be a near impossible task....

I would say you're right but for the word "near".

You're trying to fight ideas with guns.