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  1. #1

    The coolest Topps card from every year?

    Some of these are obvious choices. Some are personal choices from the authors. Either way, this is a fun read.

    I'll post my personal list later in the comments, and I would love to see your lists too...

    https://www.mlb.com/cut4/the-coolest...ar/c-289614258

  2. Kronozio
  3. #2
    Probably one of the coolest and most interesting stories posted on MLB.com in a long time. Highly recommend it to everyone on here.
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  4. #3
    Cool article, for sure! And better than the usual stuff from Cut4.

    As a child of the 1980s, I think I might look through my '80s binders tonight and find my coolest Topps card from each set. Might be fun if other SCF members post their favorite cards from one of the decades, and explain why they're the favorites.

  5. #4
    Here goes my list.

    '51 - Tommy Holmes
    Why I like it - There is a variation. Even better, the variation references a minor league team and his role as a player/manager (something you don't see much anymore).

    '52 - Mantle
    Why I like it - Simple... It's arguably the most iconic card of all time (the only competition would be Wagner or MAYBE Goudey Ruth).

    '53 - Satchel Paige
    Why I like it - One of only three cards from his playing career... And his only card with the Browns (the team he played his most MLB games with, and the team he made his MLB debut against five years earlier).

    '54 - Johnny Lipon
    Why I like it - Possibly my all time favorite Topps card. I talked about it extensively on this thread: https://www.sportscardforum.com/thre...-Thread/page51

    '55 - Eddie Mathews
    Why I like it - I own a GORGEOUS copy of this card that I should probably send off for grading. He's also the only player to play for the Braves in all three cities of their franchise history.

    '56 - Wally Westlake
    Why I like it - He's the oldest living All Star. On the card, he's pictured with the Phillies (my wife's team) in the headshot, and the Cardinals (my team) in the inset. He still signs TTM, BTW. He typically sends some extra goodies too.

    '57 - Whitey Ford
    Why I like it - The first vintage card I remember owning. Bought a low grade version for next to nothing when I was a kid in the late 80s. The front looks good, but the back is covered in thick school glue. I still own the card 30 years later.

    '58 - Orlando Cepeda
    Why I like it - I'm pretty sure it's the oldest HOF RC in my collection. This card beats Maris' RC every time, IMO.

    '59 - Bob Gibson
    Why I like it - My least favorite set of the 50s really only has one redeeming quality... Bob Gibson's RC

    I'll post my 60s list in the near future. Would love to see other collector's lists, too.

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by CardsAndPhils View Post
    '52 - Mantle
    Why I like it - Simple... It's arguably the most iconic card of all time (the only competition would be Wagner or MAYBE Goudey Ruth).
    It would be interesting to me to see which one is the most iconic. You'd have to ask people who know nothing about collecting or even sports I guess if they could recognize either. Sort of like how you know somebody is famous if the little old lady down the block knows who it is. Ruth wouldn't come close to the other two in my opinion as I don't even think all the people on this site could even describe what the Goudey Ruth looks like.
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  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by pwaldo View Post
    It would be interesting to me to see which one is the most iconic. You'd have to ask people who know nothing about collecting or even sports I guess if they could recognize either. Sort of like how you know somebody is famous if the little old lady down the block knows who it is. Ruth wouldn't come close to the other two in my opinion as I don't even think all the people on this site could even describe what the Goudey Ruth looks like.
    Yeah, the Goudey Ruth is a dark horse, for sure. Honestly, I only included it because of the player and it's one of only a handful of cards I've ever seen transformed into pop art.

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by CardsAndPhils View Post
    '54 - Johnny Lipon
    Why I like it - Possibly my all time favorite Topps card. I talked about it extensively on this thread: https://www.sportscardforum.com/thre...-Thread/page51
    Sheesh. That might be the wackiest collection of mistakes I've ever seen on a baseball card. Thanks for providing all the interesting info!
    Last edited by Thick McRunfast; 08-15-2018 at 09:24 AM.

  9. #8
    I think the discussion of most iconic can be narrowed to the Mantle and Wagner. I know what the Goudey Ruth looks like but I have to think about it. '52 Mantle immediately brings a picture of a smiling Mantle to mind with the Broadway light nameplate and I immediately see Pittsburg in my mind when Wagner is mentioned.

    Coolest Topps card ever is the 1971 Topps Thurman Munson #5
    I PC Jeff Frye, Ozzie Smith, and Jeff Bagwell.
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  10. #9
    Here are my picks for The Coolest Topps Card From Every Year. I chose the decade of my childhood, the 1980s. Selections are based more on subject matter than on star power, but you'll still see some big names.

    1980: Mario Guerrero #49

    I miss the days when base runners would try real hard to break up a double play, and middle infielders had to leap over them while keeping their focus. It's difficult to tell from the image, but it looks like that Tiger's slide may have taken him completely through the bag (I think he's holding onto it there with his right hand). Regardless, this card captures the moment in battle perfectly.

    1980 3.jpg

    1981: Manny Trillo #470

    The batter has just hit a bloop toward short right field, and Manny 's about to flip his sunglasses down and give chase. Love the classic powder-blue and maroon uniforms, too.

    1981 1.JPG

    1982: Carlton Fisk #111, In Action
    In a set where there’s not much action – even in the “In Action” series – this card really stands out. The baseball is just out of frame, somewhere near the Topps logo, and on the left side of the card you can spot the umpire jogging out from behind home plate to get a clear view of the play.

    1982 1.jpg

    1983: Eddie Murray #530
    Eddie is exuding confidence and swagger with his posture here. I feel like the pitcher had absolutely no chance to get his next pitch by the future Hall-of-Famer.

    1983 2.jpg

    1984: Rickey Henderson #230

    In 1983, the year this photo was taken, Rickey Henderson piled up 108 stolen bases. Think one of those 108 was soon to happen here?

    1984 3.jpg

    1985: Mike Pagliarulo #638, rookie card

    Growing up in New York, “Pags” was a favorite of mine. If you want an example of a classic baseball card, this is it. The pose, the batting gloves, Yankee Stadium as a backdrop, the bat and top hat logo on the bottom right. I can almost hear Phil Rizzuto calling the game on WPIX channel 11 now, "Holy cow, Pagliarulo got a hold of that one! That ball is . . . outta here!"

    1985 2.jpg

    1986: Charlie Moore #137
    1986 Topps gave me the most difficult time in choosing a favorite. The set has a lot of great action shots – much more than some other sets of the 1980s. And in a way that’s too bad, because 1986 Topps is often overlooked for its lack of rookie cards, and for what could have been (the 1986 Traded set has most of the firepower: Barry Bonds, Bobby Bonilla, Jose Canseco, Will Clark, Andres Galarraga, Bo Jackson, Wally Joyner).

    But for card #136, the camera was aimed toward Charlie Moore and the photographer clicked the shutter at the perfect time. The veteran catcher is about to unleash a throw toward what looks like third base. His cage is already off (note the soft baseball cap – old school). Dirt is being kicked up around home plate. The runner must be scurrying back to the bag in a panic, knowing a laser beam will be headed toward the third baseman's open glove in an instant. If ancient potters painted baseball players on their pottery instead of Olympians or hieroglyphs, Charlie Moore’s pose here would have been a well-practiced design.

    1986 6.jpg

    1987: Kevin Mitchell #653
    This was the one card selection I had no doubt about. Because this is a baseball card. Mitchell is emerging from his home-plate slide in a cloud of dirt and dust. His facial expression shows childlike exuberance. In all the excitement and commotion, the ball may have even gotten past Expos catcher Mike Fitzgerald. The home crowd in the background? They’re all on their feet. On top of that, you have a great view of those classic 1980s Mets uniforms.

    1987 1.jpg

    1988: Tom Lasorda #74, Manager
    Hi baseball fans, it’s me, Tom Lasorda! In a golf cart!

    1988 2.jpg

    1989: Darryl Strawberry #300
    Darryl Strawberry had a remarkable career, but it could have been even better. And if his career had panned out so completely, the image on this card might have been used as a study for the bronze statue the Mets would have made for him and placed in front of Citi Field.

    1989 3.jpg

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