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  1. #1

    If the technology is available, allow the NHL refs to use it

    By Jacques Demers, as told to USA TODAY
    I watched Detroit Red Wings forward Marian Hossa's controversial disallowed goal many times. It really looks like the whistle blows at the same time the puck goes in. It looks like a goal to me. But the play couldn't be reviewed and the Red Wings lost.

    Would the Red Wings have won the game? You never know. But it certainly appeared they had tied the game and if a replay had been allowed, they at least would have gone to overtime.

    That play could cost the Red Wings the series. That's why I think the NHL needs to change the rules to allow a review on whether the puck enters the net before the play is blown dead. The games are too important. There's too much at stake for a team money-wise.

    http://www.usatoday.com/sports/hocke...rmission_N.htm
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  3. #2
    I don't think they realize the potential fans they lose with this horrible officiating. I didn't see the game live, but some of my friends were watching for some reason who aren't into hockey (maybe there was MMA on after the game or something) and I talked to them the next day and they asked if I had seen it. I had not, and they described it to me and then one of them made the comment "Well, I guess since nobody watches hockey, they can't afford decent refs and since they don't have decent ref nobody wants to watch hockey". I probably couldn't have said it better myself. I know in Canada hockey is THE sport to watch, but down here Baseball, basketball, football, Nascar, MMA, are all more watched then hockey.

  4. #3
    If I'm not mistaking, there is nothing to review here. It wasn't a goal.

    If the ref is blowing the whistle, in his mind the play is dead a couple of seconds before the whistle is blown (the time it takes to get the whistle into his mouth, and actually blow it). I'm sure I've read reference to the fact that, in fact, THAT is when the play is dead. No one is arguing that the puck did or did not go in.... but if it went in after the play is dead. No question: The play was dead when the puck went in.

    It was a bad call. He should have been in a better position, so he wouldn't have lost sight of the puck. The no goal, based on when the whistle was blown, was 100% the right call.

  5. #4
    yes but the point is with todays technology that mentality is pointless, especially with the added War Room. Nobody on the play stopped play or thought the play was dead because it shouldn't have been. When this happens in the playoffs it tarnishes what declining credibility the sport may have.

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by 30ranfordfan View Post
    If I'm not mistaking, there is nothing to review here. It wasn't a goal.

    If the ref is blowing the whistle, in his mind the play is dead a couple of seconds before the whistle is blown (the time it takes to get the whistle into his mouth, and actually blow it). I'm sure I've read reference to the fact that, in fact, THAT is when the play is dead. No one is arguing that the puck did or did not go in.... but if it went in after the play is dead. No question: The play was dead when the puck went in.

    It was a bad call. He should have been in a better position, so he wouldn't have lost sight of the puck. The no goal, based on when the whistle was blown, was 100% the right call.
    Yes, rule now it is the correct call. The issue is it shouldn't be the call anymore, use video review to see if the puck was still alive. I mean this doesn't happen much, doesn't hurt to call the war room in Toronto. The issue isn't was the call bad, because it wasn't, the issue is should this rule be changed?

  7. #6
    This is the thing though.... a review would clearly show the puck was still alive, and the whistle shouldn't have been blow (I think we all agree on that) but what kind of rule change are you proposing?

    The way I'm reading this...... you're suggesting that the goal should still count, because the play shouldn't have been ruled dead, and the goal was scored so quickly after the whistle (we're talking about no more than 2 or 3 seconds) that no one really had time to stop playing because of the whistle.

    I don't see how that could work. Where do you draw the line? How long (after a whistle) is long enough for players to stop playing? 5 seconds? 10 seconds? 15 seconds? What kind of threshold do you put?

    The Whistle HAS to remain the instant that play is dead. In goals after that Whistle can't count. Bad Whistle?? I think it was in this case.... but what can you do? Giving players a few seconds of grace, to get the puck in the net, isn't the answer.

    Now.... when talking about technology, I think there is tons of room for improvements. Develop a system where the clock, the net, the puck, and the ref's whistles are all linked. Sensors in the net know when the sensor in the puck crosses their path, immediately putting on a goal light, and immediately stopping the clock. The ref's whistle could do the same thing (stop the clock) and the net would know that it's no longer active. We'd never have this conversation again.

  8. #7
    in most cases ive seen where this happens its split second difference. With technology, you can even take the linesmen off the ice and have them in a booth watching cameras where they can blow the play dead from. The refs already get in the way, take the ones that are in charge of calling icing/off sides and blowing the play dead when the puck is covered off the ice. They will be out of the way and have a much better view with a large monitor showing 2 or 3 different views of the crease.

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by 30ranfordfan View Post
    Now.... when talking about technology, I think there is tons of room for improvements. Develop a system where the clock, the net, the puck, and the ref's whistles are all linked. Sensors in the net know when the sensor in the puck crosses their path, immediately putting on a goal light, and immediately stopping the clock. The ref's whistle could do the same thing (stop the clock) and the net would know that it's no longer active. We'd never have this conversation again.
    While in theory this could work, a system like this would cause way more problems than solutions. I just spent 8 months on a final project based solely on using sensors to detect goals in hockey, and I am confident that a goal detecting system can be put in place in hockey... sure they have a very similar system in soccer now. However, the problem occurs when you start integrating other systems into the goal detecting system such as the clock or the goal light.

    The problem occurs when a goal is falsely detected. The system will be actually impossible to make 100% accurate. So, say if a puck just misses the net, the sensors may actually become triggered and say there was a goal scored. This is not a problem, because the refs can clearly see that the puck is not actually in the net. And say if it does go in and then comes out quickly, the war room can review that. However, when you start tying in systems such as the clock and gaol light into the goal detecting system it starts causing problems. The puck misses the net, but the sensors are triggered... now the light goes on and the clock stops... but the play is actually still alive. You can not introduce such a system that is not 100% accurate.

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by 30randfordfan;
    Now.... when talking about technology, I think there is tons of room for improvements. Develop a system where the clock, the net, the puck, and the ref's whistles are all linked. Sensors in the net know when the sensor in the puck crosses their path, immediately putting on a goal light, and immediately stopping the clock. The ref's whistle could do the same thing (stop the clock) and the net would know that it's no longer active. We'd never have this conversation again.

    Quote Originally Posted by BruHawk View Post
    The problem occurs when a goal is falsely detected. The system will be actually impossible to make 100% accurate. So, say if a puck just misses the net, the sensors may actually become triggered and say there was a goal scored. This is not a problem, because the refs can clearly see that the puck is not actually in the net. And say if it does go in and then comes out quickly, the war room can review that. However, when you start tying in systems such as the clock and gaol light into the goal detecting system it starts causing problems. The puck misses the net, but the sensors are triggered... now the light goes on and the clock stops... but the play is actually still alive. You can not introduce such a system that is not 100% accurate.
    I agree completely. This type of system would be great but it would have to be perfect. Bad calls happen in all sports, it's something the fans, players, and coaches have to deal with. Sometimes it is unfair, but a call is a call, if you start making exceptions, people will find a way to abuse the exceptions.

  11. #10
    Since we have the technology, why don't we just take all the officials off the ice?


    We as hockey fans need to lay off the officiating already. Every team has to deal with, it therefore the playing field is even and there are enough games played through out the season and post season that bad calls will not dictate who makes the playoffs and who wins the cup. Isn't that all that really matters when a season is officially in the books?

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